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  1. ‘Bosch’ Boss Discusses Eleanor’s Big Scene and What’s Coming in Season 5
  2. Queen of Angels by Greg Bear – a review – blood on forgotten walls
  3. Hot TV Topics
  4. Join Kobo & start eReading today

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To find out more, including how to control cookies, see here: Cookie Policy. I like commas. Of course, I had a professor once yell at me for my propensity toward using them too liberally, so this could be a personal issue! View 2 comments. Jun 02, Dan Sutton rated it it was amazing. In my opinion, this is the finest novel ever written - by anyone. This novel is so much more than the sum of its parts, and is so beautifully constructed and written that one is left with a sense of wonder that anyone would even attempt to write it The book is both so fiercely intelligent and so intellectually and emotionally challenging that the reader is left exhausted: it has a shattering effect upon the In my opinion, this is the finest novel ever written - by anyone.

The book is both so fiercely intelligent and so intellectually and emotionally challenging that the reader is left exhausted: it has a shattering effect upon the psyche. A magnificent achievement. It's fun to look at the reviews which give it only one or two stars. None of the people who wrote them can spell or punctuate correctly. This should tell you something. Mar 09, Nadine May rated it it was amazing Shelves: science-fiction. This novel is a must for psychologists who are science fiction readers! I found it difficult to get into this book at the beginning, but knowing this author's skill to make you think, I persevered and got my reward.

The country of our mind is truly an incredible reality where we create our own illusions. I perceive our 'Soul' to be the culmination of our consciousness experiences in or out of our human body, and this novel takes the reader through the psyche of a serial killer! Bear continues for This novel is a must for psychologists who are science fiction readers!

Bear continues forcing his reader in over their heads, and not insulting us by explaining everything, but, rather, allowing us to "swim" and form our own pictures of the action. This pattern can be, at best, off-putting, and, at worst, infuriating, but the result in "Queen" is, in my opinion, well worth the effort.

Bear understands that in sci-if, there is no such thing as a free lunch, and thus he has again endeared himself to me. Mar 11, Scott rated it did not like it. Greg Bear is clearly trying out a different writing style for this book, but I'm not sure how it is supposed to set the tone or inform the reader how these characters think. In reality, it is extremely annoying and tiring. He fails to use punctuation, like commas, in any of the character train-of-thought. There are enough run-on-sentences in these pages to make your eyes bleed.

It is exhausting to decipher it all, and the story just isn't worth all the work. Another reviewer Stephen , "This book blew my brain and left my skull a cracked, smoking husk containing nothing but remnants of wows and questions. It's an interlacing cyber-fi story of 4 groups of 'people' having what in common?

That's my question. My initial thought was it's a modern rendition of Crime and Punishment. I do think there may be s Another reviewer Stephen , "This book blew my brain and left my skull a cracked, smoking husk containing nothing but remnants of wows and questions. I do think there may be something to this. Another major theme deals with the nature of sentience, or self-awareness. And a 3rd about government surveillance of all individuals. My problem is I have not figured out how these 3 thread are related from this novel alone.

Was it unclear? Is the author free-associating ideas? Did I just not get it? Perhaps its sequels will help my confusion. Jun 19, Dylan rated it it was ok. If there's one unifying problem in bad science fiction, it's the tendency to overload books with too many ideas. Queen of Angels is a perfect example of this mistake. After the poet Emmanuel Goldsmith murders eight of his friends with no apparent motive, the novel picks up four different threads of plot 1 Mary Choy, a policewoman pursuing Goldsmith.

You may wonder what Jill's story has to do with the other three. Frankly, I do too. All of Jill's sections of the novel could have been cut, and it would have had little influence on the other three threads. This problem repeats in the other plot threads. There is little connection or interaction between Choy and Burke's stories. Fettle could have been cut entirely with no alterations to the other three threads. Honestly, I wish he'd been cut, given that he does little other than 1 whine and 2 act like a prick. Choy's sections of the novel are compelling and interesting, packed with good ideas that I'd like to see expanded on at length.

Burke's story makes for an interesting thriller, but every time Bear attempts to discuss psychology or neuroscience, it becomes increasingly clear that he knows very little about either field, making the technical exposition slow the already-cumbersome plot. But as-is, no story is given enough space to flower, Fettle is dull at best, and the technical exposition in Burke's story is just embarrassing. I really wanted to like Queen of Angels- there are some really interesting ideas here- but I just couldn't. Mar 02, Stephen Robertson rated it liked it Shelves: audible , science-fiction , award-winning-or-nominated , paperback.


  • Evaluating Feynman integrals.
  • State Power: A Strategic-Relational Approach!
  • Studies of Supply and Demand in Higher Education (National Bureau of Economic Research Project Report).
  • Peace, Love & Liberty.
  • / Slant by Greg Bear.
  • Description.
  • Design for Six Sigma Statistics: 59 Tools for Diagnosing and Solving Problems in DFFS Initiatives.

He's a writer. His writings are quoted throughout. Last night, the first investigation team had gone to the third foot of East Comb One in response to neighborhood medical detectors picking up traces of human decay. In the first two hours the team had mounted a sniffer, performed assay and scanned for heat trails. Then the freezers had come and tombed the whole apartment. Senior in her watch, Mary had been assigned this rare homicide at seven hundred. Spin of the hour. From the large scale to the microbial everything would be sifted and analyzed and by tomorrow or the day after they would know something about everyone who had been in and out of the apartment over the last year.

The above 1. He imagines housing, He imagines forensics. This no longer means a state-pd lawyer for the defense, it means a cop. Bear's reimagining of the 'justice' system bears examination by 'Injustice System' Activists of today. Just as I'm interested in a future where permission can be granted "to Quote Unattributed Passages" so am I interested in a future acronym of "O.

Tech details are provided: ""By cutting through the galaxy's magnetic field and generating this electricity, AXIS relied on the law of conservation of energy to decelerate even more quickly without the use of onboard fuel. The power drawn from its vast wings was more han sufficient to dispel the cold of deep space; but AXIS waited for proximity to Alpha Centauri B to begin to grow its biologic thinker system.

His writing tends to a Draconian perception of humanity: " Examiner: "I remember Mr. You've been before this court before, have you not? In this case, the reader may just respond to the name "Bormann" as a fictional one. OR they may hearken back to "Martin Bormann": "Bormann joined a paramilitary Freikorps organisation in while working as manager of a large estate.

Bormann probably committed suicide on a bridge near Lehrter station. The body was buried nearby on 8 May , but was not found and confirmed as Bormann's until ; the identification was reaffirmed in by DNA tests.

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‘Bosch’ Boss Discusses Eleanor’s Big Scene and What’s Coming in Season 5

Bormann was tried in absentia by the International Military Tribunal in the Nuremberg trials of and He was convicted of war crimes and crimes against humanity and sentenced to death by hanging. The treatment of criminals in Bear's not-so-far-distant-future involves giving them therapy, reshaping their personalities. Much of the novel revolves around aspects of this. Martin, another main character, the "O. The poet. He murdered Mr. Albigoni's daughter three nights ago.

Albigoni was—is—Mr. Goldsmith's publisher and friend. He bears him no ill will. Vacancies were becoming more and more rare as rejuvenators plied their controversial trade, turning good citizens into multicentarian eloi. Wells's The Time Machine. There is a price, tho. Sometimes the Morlock take the Eloi underground to eat them or some such. Now imagine the Eloi, as Bear does, as people rich enough to afford tretaments that enable longevity. Are we there yet? We might be closer than one might think. Imagine parents who live long lives spending all the family money on being kept alive.

See a Problem?

Money that might've once gone to the children to help them thru precarious old age is kept instead for the oldest while the children die off in deprivation. It seems to me that medical practice, in the US at least, revolves largely around taking every cent from old people for things like extremely expensive drugs to keep their internal organs going when they might otherwise be ready to give up the ghost.

The patients won't die until the medical system has drained the family coffers. Bear's imagining of forensics in is one of my favrote things about this novel: "All nonhuman debris were within normal levels in the metabolic carpet. Goldsmith did not smoke or use powder or aerosol drugs. Guests brought in detritus consistent with their travel-paths through apartment and points of origin. Clothing and other fiber matches consistent with above conditions and patterns. Analysis of nondomestic nontailored microbes consistent with above conditions and patterns.

It's mostly about but, of course, there's some history leading up to then. Some predictions are mainly wishful thinking about the possible but implausible. It's as I write this: "["]in , five nations, headed by the young technological giant China, decided to build the first interstellar probe.


  1. Books | FanFiction!
  2. Zoo.
  3. Authors : Bear, Greg : SFE : Science Fiction Encyclopedia.
  4. Slant Magazine;
  5. Reluctantly, the United States was persuaded to join" - pp The "Reluctantly" part is perhaps the most accurate. Not exactly an impressive track record for a nation that supposedly values "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness". I suppose that's 'Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness unless somebody wants to get rich off of sex slavery or cluster bombs or polluting the environment or whatever'. The city lay beneath uniform pewter clouds pushing in from the sea, decapitating the combs. There might be no usable sun this evening perhaps even rain but still the combs arranged themselves as if motivated by guilt for their shadowing presence.

    Highrises that block out the sun from the 'low-lifes'? What about highways that bisect neighborhoods or go entirely too close to houses that were once peacefully located, that're now subjected to constant noise? Not to be too obvious or anything but that stuff only happens in poor neighborhoods where the victims are too poor to effectively resist in legal fashion. Another thing that usually interests me in SF is descriptions of imagined future technology.

    Eevn tho I'm not really that much of a tech-buff it's fun to imagine what might be ferasible: ""I'm reading about your triple focus receptor. It picks up signals from circuitry established in the skin by special neurological nano. It's designed to track activity at twenty-three different points around the hippocampus and corpus callosum. It is the alphabet and foundation on which we base all of our thinking and language, all our symbologies.

    Every thought, every personal action, is reflected in this region. All of our myths and religious symbols are based upon its common contents. All routines and subroutines, all personalities and talents and agents, all mental structures, are reflected in its features and occupants, or are reflections of them. I don't think that support made his "literary standing" "secure" tho. On the same page, Bear has Goldsmith using the pun "eRace".

    Bear wd've used that no later than when the bk was published.

    Queen of Angels by Greg Bear – a review – blood on forgotten walls

    I've always liked the term when I've encountered it at political protests. One idea that, to my disappointment, doesn't get explored further is: "legal implications of decl. Bear's near-future imaginings has much to hold my attn. A major part of it is "a complex of computing and thinking systems" p trying to detect their having a sense of self: ""Are you unified? Return to keyboard, please. I don't think that you are truly self aware.

    In most homes nanofood prepared itself out of sight; not in Ernest's. The oven automatically heated everything to it desired temperature then opened its door and slide the meal out for their inspection. The story stand alone fairly well but there are a lot of references to things that happened before that I felt I would benefit from having more info about. I'm not going to spoil it so I'm just going to say that the premise, the cause of why people are having problems, didn't make sense to me.

    I have some experience with people who have the modern day version and I can't imagine why the person who started it all would have ma I think I would have enjoyed this better if I had read the first book. I have some experience with people who have the modern day version and I can't imagine why the person who started it all would have made that choice. I know in the back of the book he says it's fictional but really, it has to be based on some kind of reality or don't use the name at all.

    Maybe it would have made more sense if I'd read the original book.


    • / Slant by Greg Bear.
    • Delivering Doctor Amelia: The Story of a Gifted Young Obstetricians Error and the Psychologist Who Helped Her.
    • Queen of Angels?
    • Beauty and the Beast: The Story of Nastassja & Klaus Kinski!
    • Personality and Individual Differences?
    • Queen of Angels by Greg Bear – a review;

    Oct 31, Andy rated it really liked it Shelves: science-fiction. I need to compare intra-book year dates because this one started out a bit confusing. You end the last book with Mars doing it's dance and then you are back at what I can only guess is after Queen of Angels --which Let's abstract then and just dove-tail it behind book 1. Yay, makes a bunch more sense. It's been a little time but not a lot and we rejoin Choy, Martain, Jill and new cast members.

    We return to a world in confusion and something dark unfurling the human cond I need to compare intra-book year dates because this one started out a bit confusing. We return to a world in confusion and something dark unfurling the human condition that was thought to be truly conditioned. Once again we dive into the shady realm of humanity, it's goals, it's desires, fabrications, truths, perceptions, and more.

    QoA 3 would be a great mini-movie segway tucked in there. Otherwise I felt episodic shows as I read most of these books that would translate very easily. Most of what is envisioned is person-to-person relationships and psyche dives. Not a huge 'future-tek' 3d investment needed. Random digression I agree, but thought I'd share. A lot of energy to start, something to go wrong, something going wrong, thinkers getting lost thinking, good-ol-boys both high level and low level types trying to 'preserve' their spaces through all sorts of in the end, idiocy, but how it is wrought is deep enough to give you understanding.

    However, like Bear does with most of his books not deep enough to give you a rock solid foundation. You get enough to get by, maybe a pinch more on some tougher concepts and then that's all you need--let's 'roll that beautiful bean footage. The characters feel at rest.

    The story has an end. The world has both its past and its future to create but that will not be done here. If you want another good novel and you've traveled this far I think you'll enjoy it. I would however ponder stuffing this in behind the first book if you want more continuity of story. Feb 12, Ryan Schneider rated it it was ok. SLANT is well written and has lots of cool futuristic lingo which takes forever to figure out, plus an ensemble cast of characters whom I constantly had to try and remember each time there was a POV shift.

    Greg Bear makes an interesting sociological observation about how pornography and the instant gratification mentality so prevalent today is a risky, and potentially destructive one. But I found my interest lagging toward the end. I ended up reading really, really quickly through the big climax c SLANT is well written and has lots of cool futuristic lingo which takes forever to figure out, plus an ensemble cast of characters whom I constantly had to try and remember each time there was a POV shift.

    I ended up reading really, really quickly through the big climax chapter so that I could get to the end, see what became of each character, and then move on to my next book. It does have a lot of sexy scenes. It also forecasts where technology will be in another fifty years or so, particularly how nanotechnology will have evolved and infiltrated its way into our culture; how our culture will become ever-more interlaced with media and the endless stream of data, and how companies like Disney will be making the ultimate virtual reality porn.

    I found this look into the future to be the most enjoyable aspect of SLANT, rather then the plot itself. Jul 26, Graham Crawford rated it did not like it. He has obviously read a tiny bit of science, and got the wrong end of the stick - and since this is the entire point of the book I wish SF editors employed a tame science grad to filter the shit that gets through!!! Jul 25, Nicholas Barone rated it really liked it. Slant is the 4th novel written by Greg Bear in the setting he introduced in the novel Queen of Angels - an Earth which has been transformed by nanotechnology.

    In internal chronology, it is the second of the 4 novels, so I chose to read it right after finishing Queen of Angels. Slant is, in a word, excellent. Where the story in QoA occasionally dragged, Slant's story is a high energy, fast paced page turner. The story takes place several years after the events of QoA. Three of the main characters Slant is the 4th novel written by Greg Bear in the setting he introduced in the novel Queen of Angels - an Earth which has been transformed by nanotechnology.

    Three of the main characters from Queen of Angels return in Slant - Mary Choy, the transform public defender; Martin Burke, a pioneering but disgraced therapist; and Jill, the world's first and foremost sentient thinker AI. As the story unfolds, Mary and Martin each find themselves investigating symptoms of a potential epidemic. Jill, meanwhile, has been contacted by Roddy - a thinker that is apparently not based on the algorithms that gave Jill sentience, and a complete mystery to Jill. The 4th main storyline follows Jack Giffey, a highly competent saboteur who feels driven to take down Omphalos - a building designed by an elite society to store its members cryogenically frozen bodies.

    I found each of the main storylines compelling, and Bear does an excellent job of weaving them together.

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    Giffey's story, in particular, kept me glued to the pages as it describes his high tech, nanotechnology fueled attack against Omphalos. Great story, great ideas, great read. I am looking forward to reading Heads the third novel by internal chronology. Slant is set in an all-too-possible future United States where people are constantly hooked often physically into an advanced version of the Internet and it is routine to undergo mental therapy, mediated and maintained by nanobots that float freely in one's bloodstream till the end of their days.

    Dataflow rules all, and people are generally consumed by information. Immortality is within reach There is a lot going on in Slant , and Slant is set in an all-too-possible future United States where people are constantly hooked often physically into an advanced version of the Internet and it is routine to undergo mental therapy, mediated and maintained by nanobots that float freely in one's bloodstream till the end of their days.

    There is a lot going on in Slant , and that can be as much downside as bonus. It takes a while to get into the main storyline. The perspective jumps from character to character to character throughout the book, and this is especially confusing throughout the first Part. At first the threads are unconnected--is Bear simply weaving a setting for us to enjoy?

    Laying out themes to ponder and a cautionary tale of what humanity might become in fifty or fewer years? But sure enough, eventually the threads criss-cross, then merge into a focused storyline, which covers the latter third of the novel. Overall, this is a solid piece of science fiction that's worth a read. But, I would advise being prepared to read in larger chunks--at first, you will need to in order to keep the plotlines straight; later, you'll just want to keep reading to find out how it all is going to play out. Apr 28, Liz rated it really liked it Shelves: science-fiction , hardcore , favorites.

    Brilliant and scintillating possible future that seems all too tangible a reality when read a decade after its first publication. Depending upon your own personal slant , you will either be horrified or anticipatory of the technology presented in this story. Possible futures based upon current world trends fascinate me. Books written when certain types of technology are in their infancy; those that seem to be a self-fulfilling prophecy 10 years later on; are a fantastic read, almost a horror story Brilliant and scintillating possible future that seems all too tangible a reality when read a decade after its first publication.

    Books written when certain types of technology are in their infancy; those that seem to be a self-fulfilling prophecy 10 years later on; are a fantastic read, almost a horror story where you can see a tangible reality forming. Some readers will find it difficult to read but the trick is to suspend your need to understand every nuance immediately.

    Either understanding will come later or you will get bogged down in something created solely to lend a depth of reality and a specific tone to the overall story unfolding. Different in style but along a similar predictive future theme I also enjoyed and recommend David Brin Earth Feb 01, Berry Muhl rated it it was amazing.

    If you're not thoroughly steeped in hard sci-fi idiom and technological understanding, don't even try. If you're a braniac who seeks bragging rights for having fought through a dense, intricate and challenging novel, don't make excuses. Just read it. I wasn't aware when I picked this up that it's the fourth in a series.

    Now I have to find the others and read them, in order. Bear doesn't insult your intelligence. He doesn't offer exposition or explication or definitions. He just throws you, a haple If you're not thoroughly steeped in hard sci-fi idiom and technological understanding, don't even try.

    He just throws you, a hapless real-world Fry, into the future, and expects you to figure out the slang, the labels, the meanings on your own. Mar 26, Andreas rated it liked it. I am still not entirely sure what this novel is about. It is a near future tale, with few traditional SciFi space trappings. I enjoyed it quite a bit, and my final conclusion is that Bear is writing about societal trends that may appear in the future, in particular the impact of the very rich wanting to live for a very long time. Not nearly as epic as Eon and Eternity, it is nevertheless a solid work.

    Oct 06, Tim rated it did not like it Shelves: not-finished. Had to abandon this I was never sure what I was reading, who was doing it, and why all the sex I think seemed so yucky. Nov 07, Surly rated it liked it. I recently read Queen of Angels and while Goodreads calls this the fourth book in the series, Wikipedia emphatically states this is the sequel. Where Queen of Angels was an ambitious exploration of race, and perhaps the thornier Jungian concept of race memory, Slant takes the same approach to sex.

    In both meanings: gender or gender roles as well as copulation. And while Bear is plenty daring with that theme, Slant doesn't quite reach the heights that Queen of Angels did. The basic problem is th I recently read Queen of Angels and while Goodreads calls this the fourth book in the series, Wikipedia emphatically states this is the sequel. The basic problem is the characterization. None of the characters, men or women, really sing out. The women are foils or plot devices; the men are driven by dim sense of family or obligation, with the protagonist Jonathan seeming particularly milquetoast.

    Toward the end of the book, Bear collects all his characters together without giving the reader a good sense of why: Giffey wants to blow shit up for some unnamed reason; Mary is a Seattle police officer but goes to Idaho because, well, just because she should be there. That robbed the story of some emotional impact. You want nano, virtual sex, cryogenic sleep, artificial intelligences, they're all there.

    While the rising action doesn't quite ratchet up to true potboiler levels, there's a heist story at the center of the tale with a fine twist at the end. And some details, the disenfranchised god-and-guns underclass, seem prescient and give Slant a little bit of a satirical edge. If you're willing to overlook a clumsy take on sexual dynamics, you're left with a perfectly entertaining cyberpunk novel. Jul 26, Simon rated it liked it Shelves: sf-fantasy. Too long and contains a bizarre mix of ideas which don't always gel porn, Tourette's syndrome, eugenics, AI.

    Also, I hate books which hide the fact that they're actually sequels. I think this one more or less stands on its own, but nothing on the cover tells you that it's actually the fourth in a series, which is annoying.

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    Having said that, some of the ideas are interesting, although there's a lot of murky plotting to get through before you realise what's really going on, and then the ramificat Too long and contains a bizarre mix of ideas which don't always gel porn, Tourette's syndrome, eugenics, AI. Having said that, some of the ideas are interesting, although there's a lot of murky plotting to get through before you realise what's really going on, and then the ramifications of the "baddies"' plans aren't really explored.

    Sometimes I feel like it'd be more interesting to let the villains win, just so we could get to see what they do next. It's also a little uneven in how it deals with the characters: some are mere ciphers fulfilling a plot function, while others are treated in much more depth to an extent unusual for this kind of book. This book starts disjointed, lonely, a series of meaningless vignettes. By the end, the author weaves each thread into a masterfully told tale.

    If you can hang in for the first part, the payoff is a rich, thought-provoking read that will stay with you long after. Sadly, the e-book edition I read was a travesty of editorial errors. By the end, I was convinced it had been converted from paper to electronic by using a scanner and OCR - with little or no human editing afterward - which explains the r This book starts disjointed, lonely, a series of meaningless vignettes.

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    By the end, I was convinced it had been converted from paper to electronic by using a scanner and OCR - with little or no human editing afterward - which explains the randomly dropped or added commas, quotation marks, and hyphens. It also explains misspellings like "arid" for "and", which occur throughout. The irony of a book whose themes include over-reliance on technology being butchered by over-reliance on technology is so very meta-.